Skip to main content

Speakers

Stephen KnottStephen F. Knott

Lecture:  Washington, Hamilton, and the American Presidency
Friday, April 14, 12:30pm Main 006

Stephen F. Knott is a professor of national security affairs at the United States Naval War College. Prior to this position, Knott was co-chair of the Presidential Oral History Program at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He has taught at the University of Virginia and the United States Airforce Academy.  His books include Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth and Secret and Sanctioned: Covert Operations and the American Presidency. His most recent book is Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance that Forged America, co-authored with Tony Williams.


.

James Read


















Dr. James Read

Lecture: Peaceful Transfer of Power in a Violent World: Jefferson, Hamilton, and the Limits of Partisan Conflict 
Friday, March 31, 3:30pm Main 006

The lecture will describe the intense political and personal conflicts between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton – but also the ways in which both men, in different ways, worked to prevent those conflicts from destroying the fledgling American republic.

James Read Professor of Political Science with the College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University since 1988. A.B., University of Chicago, 1980; M.A., Harvard University, 1983; Ph.D, 1988. He was the Joseph P. Farry Professor of Public Policy at CSB/SJU, and has been Visiting Professor of Political Science at University of California-Davis. Dr. Read is the author of Majority Rule versus Consensus: The Political Thought of John C. Calhoun (University Press of Kansas, 2009), Power versus Liberty: Madison, Hamilton, Wilson, and Jefferson (University of Virginia Press, 2000) and Doorstep Democracy: Face to Face Politics in the Heartland (University of Minnesota Press, 2008).




About

The Center for American Constitutionalism's mission is to explore the meaning of liberty in the American constitutional system, with specific emphasis on the Founder's commitment to limited and responsible government that promotes individual liberty, free markets, and a strong national defense. We seek to produce publications that examine these issues and to enhance the educational opportunities for Utah State students interested in these issues.


Anthony A. Peacock

Anthony PeacockAnthony A. Peacock is professor and department head in the Political Science Department at Utah State University. He is also Co-Director of USU’s Center for the Study of American Constitutionalism. Peacock is the author or editor of numerous books, including most recently Vindicating the Commercial Republic: The Federalist on Union, Enterprise, and War (Lexington Books, forthcoming), How to Read The Federalist Papers (The Heritage Foundation, 2010), Freedom and the Rule of Law (Lexington Books, 2010), and Deconstructing the Republic: Voting Rights, the Supreme Court, and the Founders’ Republicanism Reconsidered (The AEI Press, 2008)

Peacock has also published many articles, book chapters, and book reviews on American law and politics. Peacock has provided media commentary on national and state politics and has lectured on American politics and law both nationally and internationally. He currently sits on the Advisory Board of the “Coalition of Freedom” for the National Constitution Center and on the Utah State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. At Utah State Peacock has taught courses in the fields of constitutional law, constitutional theory, law and policy, law, politics, and war, and political theory.

Peter McNamara

Peter McNamaraPeter McNamara teaches political theory and political economy at Utah State University.  He is the author of Political Economy and Statesmanship: Smith, Hamilton and the Foundation of the Commercial Republic and the editor of The Noblest Minds: Fame, Honor and the American Founding, and (with Louis Hunt), Liberalism, Conservatism and Hayek's Idea of Spontaneous Order.

He has written on a wide variety of other topics including Hayek’s moral theory, political opportunism, Jefferson’s federalism, and the intellectual origins of business schools.  He has taught at Boston College and Clemson University, where he was a Hayek Visiting Scholar. He has also worked as a research officer for the Australian Treasury.